Yellow Fever: the Internment

What are inalienable rights? Of the 110,000 Japanese-American citizens interned in concentration camps in the USA after Pearl Harbor, not one was ever convicted of spying for Japan. This play travels through the history of the Japanese-American internment and correlates anti-Asian laws like the Asian Exclusion Act, racist ideologies and 1940s wartime hysteria to the “yellow fever.”  It uncovers the intentionally erased history and connects history to the present.Through Asian performance art, multimedia and a blend of music and dance, this play travels through the history of the Japanese-American internment, racist ideologies and 1940s wartime hysteria.

The Asian Exclusion Act was the precursor that set the stage for the spread of Yellow Fever and anti-Asian racism. Around the period of World War II, these racist attitudes and stereotypes were created and perpetuated throughout the media. Of the 110,000 Japanese-American people to be interned after Pearl Harbor, not one was convicted of spying for Japan.

Yellow Fever: the Internment explores the mysteries behind the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and the stories that have been withheld from our collective consciousness.

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